Chalk up yet another gamer headache to the growing proclivity of DRM in PC games. Ubisoft, perhaps the biggest proponent of DRM, promised that when transitioning their game servers players of a select few of their more popular titles would be unaffected by the switch — yet reports are coming in of problems.

It all started last week when Ubisoft announced they would be switching their PC and Mac games servers, and would be forced to take down online services for a handful of games including Hawx 2, The Settlers 7, and Assassin’s Creed for Mac (many other games were to be “affected”). It was a minor inconvenience for some, but Ubisoft was holding to the promise that higher profile games like Assassin’s Creed Revelations and Driver: San Francisco would be unaffected on the PC.

However, now comes word that Driver: SF players are unable to log onto the servers, meaning somewhere in the switch Ubisoft made a mistake. This also means that those who purchase Driver brand new will be unable to register their product, making it nigh unplayable.

Ubisoft has reached out through Twitter to say they are aware of the problem and working hard to fix it, but will not say where they went wrong. At this point the only affected game being thrown around is Driver, but the switch only just started yesterday.

Once again gamers, and publishers, are faced with one of the bigger flaws of the always-on DRM. Ubisoft thought a transition like this, which should improve gamers’ experience, would keep their bigger moneymakers unaffected, but somehow they screwed that up. And instead of making that improvement they are sure to get lambasted once again.

The migration has now successfully gone through, and all online services should be back up and running according to Ubisoft, but that shouldn’t undermine the real issue that appeared.

Any PC players out there that found they were unable to log on to their Ubisoft games? What event will finally be the nail in the coffin of always on DRM and will force Ubisoft to go another route?

Source: Ubisoft, Eurogamer

 

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