Quantum Break Releasing on Steam, PC Retail Version Announced

By | 2 months ago 

Microsoft confirms that Quantum Break will be released on Steam and that the Quantum Break: Timeless Collector’s Edition will be sold for PC at retail.

Remedy Entertainment’s physics and time-bending shooter Quantum Break received many positive reviews, with gamers excited to get their hands on the game. However, those on PC were disappointed to find that Quantum Break would not have Steam support, meaning that if they wanted to buy it, they would have to do so via the Windows Store.

But, Microsoft has now announced that Quantum Break will be coming to Steam. Quantum Break will go live on Steam on September 14 and will be optimized for PC’s running Windows 7 (64-bit), unlike the Windows Store version which is only available on machines running Windows 10. Nordic Games is handling Steam porting duties and the game will cost $39.99.

If PC players are looking for a little extra Quantum Break gameplay for their buck though, then the newly announced PC retail version will feature just that. Quantum Break: Timeless Collector’s Edition will cost $39.99 and will also work on Windows 7 and up. This special version of the game features “premium packaging,” a making of book, a making of Blu-ray, a soundtrack CD, two posters and a quickstart guide. There will also be five game discs and a one-time Steam activation is required – that seems may seem a little fussy for some, but hopefully the added extras will make it worth it.


The decision to bring Quantum Break to Steam follows (Xbox boss) Phil Spencer’s recent confirmation that Microsoft “will ship games on Steam again,” even if the company is still looking to establish the Windows Store as a competitor. It also follows recent suggestions by Epic Games’ Tim Sweeney that Microsoft wants to make PC a “closed platform,” and that the company is using UWP (Universal Windows Platform) to push out Steam. Sweeney even suggested that one day, Microsoft will “flip a switch” and break the Steam libraries of Windows user in an effort to get people buying all of their games via the Windows Store.

Microsoft denied Sweeney’s comments, calling the Universal Windows Platform “a fully open ecosystem,” though some were still doubtful of the company’s words in part due to moves such as making Quantum Break a Windows Store exclusive. Microsoft also doesn’t have the best track record with PC gaming. However, it seems that Microsoft is taking all of these concerns on board and many PC gamers will hope that this is a step towards bringing all new PC releases to Steam – even if players have to wait a little longer after the initial release date.

Source: Xbox Wire