Peter Molyneux of Lionhead Games is certainly no stranger to the press. Part of his job is talking to them on a pretty regular basis and sometimes, during those talks, he might stretch the truth just a tiny, tiny bit. The GDC Lifetime Achievement and BAFTA Fellowship winner admitted during his BAFTA acceptance speech that he has made up game features on the spot to keep journalists from falling asleep.

Molyneux’s latest contribution to his video game pedigree, the Fable series, has received some flack regarding some of the features, notably how Fable 2 was buggy and how there was a lack of Kinect support for Fable 3 that was previously promised. Both games were still very enjoyable despite some of the shortcomings, but are perfect examples of the truth-stretching Molyneux has admitted doing. Does this take away from the man’s commitment to video games and what he’s contributed to the video game industry? No. In fact, it’s nice to see him make the admission. Perhaps he did it due to his career celebration this year.

The official comment has that “hand caught in the cookie jar” feel and Molyneux is genuinely apologetic, for what it’s worth. Whether or not this will affect your personal opinion of the man is an entirely matter, though. Although, something can be said for coming clean about something Molyneux could have just stayed completely silent about.

“Sorry – I’ve slightly over-promised on things on occasion. I could name at least 10 features in games that I’ve made up to stop journalists going to sleep and I really apologise to the team for that.”

Here’s hoping in the future, Peter Molyneux will no longer stretch the truth regarding the games he works on and journalists won’t have a glazed look in their eye when they talk to him. It’s a problem that can be solved on both ends of equation, pay attention and lies will not be needed (not that they ever were).

But seriously, no one should say things are in the game when they’re not. It’s not about entertaining journalists, it’s about gamers paying money for these.

Source: Eurogamer

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