Ouya Is Looking To Get Acquired

By | 2 years ago 

The makers of Ouya hoped to change the console gaming world with their Android-powered platform. Now it appears they’d rather let someone else give it a go. The company, which shares the same name as its device, is reportedly looking for a lucrative acquisition, sooner rather than later.

While struggles for the upstart aren’t exactly shocking, Ouya had been expressing quite a bit of positivity about the future of the console. Reports from late last year even claimed a second version of the Ouya was on the way for 2014. It seems less likely a 2014 release of the Ouya 2 is still happening at this point, but OUYA Dev Support Office Hours show this summer featured Bob Mills, one of the lead developers, directly referencing the successor to the original release.

According to re/code, Amazon and Google have expressed interest or at least participated in preliminary acquisition talks, along with several companies in China – a country that has long been working to make itself more attractive to Western businesses. The video game industry is the newest market Chinese authorities are courting after lifting a 14-year ban on consoles in January of 2014. To be clear, no one has made an offer for Ouya at this point.

Considering early reviews for the Ouya were far from glowing, and buzz surrounding the platform has essentially died off entirely, sources claiming the purchase would be focused more on staff talent and less on the console make sense. When the Android console first made its debut on Kickstarter, making a whopping $8.5 million, there was enough excitement for it to hit its funding goals in short order. It even had some notable developer support at the time, but as more information surfaced, even the addition of titles like Final Fantasy couldn’t help fight off disappointment over a lack of top flight apps and games.

Last ditch efforts to upgrade the Ouya, including a Netflix-style game subscription service and a partnership with Xiaomi in an attempt to get the console tech into set-top boxes both fell short, hence the attempts to find a buyer rather than looking to raise more money.

Sources: re/code, Hard Core Gamer