Although PlayStation VR already controls market share over Oculus, the latter company’s virtual reality headset could make up for lost ground since its release in March of last year with potential new plans it and its parent company Facebook are cooking up. As it so happens, the VR firm is reportedly working on a brand new version of its headset that would be a standalone wireless iteration with a price point of $200.

According to Bloomberg, the forthcoming Oculus headset is inteded to become a cheaper alternative to the more high-end headsets that are currently available on the market. Apparently, Facebook means to bridge the gap between the budget Samsung Gear VR and the more expensive Rift, as the the new headset will not need to be tethered to either phone or PC in order to function and run software.

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As reported, the wireless Oculus headset model is code named “Pacific” at the moment, and will be designed in a similar manner to the Rift. Additionally, it’s set to have a lighter weight than the Gear VR, and will cater to players on-the-go, as it’s supposed to be highly portable. Furthermore, it’s declared in the report that the Oculus Pacific will be controlled with a wireless remote, and will be more so inclined toward playing games, watching movies, and social networking. While Oculus is supposedly making it more powerful than the Gear VR, the Rift will still be available as the only headset with position tracking.

When it comes to Oculus Pacific’s release date, Facebook is aiming for a launch sometime in 2018, but has declined to comment on the headset’s existence. Should the Oculus Pacific headset be an actuality, then it would definitely give the company a fighting chance in the virtual reality market against PlayStation VR, especially considering its purported ability to operate fully on its own at the much cheaper cost of $200.

The OculusĀ headset that’s code named Pacific has yet to be officially announced, but is expected to hit the market sometime in 2018.

Source: Bloomberg

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