No Man’s Sky Player Takes 12 Hours to Walk Around Half a Planet

By | 2 months ago 

In an attempt to see the scale of a planet in No Man’s Sky, time-lapser TheyCallMeConor walks around half of the globe in-game in just under 12 hours.

There’s no question that No Man‘s Sky was one of this year’s most anticipated games. So, whether players are enjoying their time exploring each one of the 18 quintillion planets, or fans have joined the anti-Sean Murray bandwagon, it’s hard to deny that the game is at least somewhat groundbreaking in its sense of scale.

Despite every planet being randomly generated, and there being more space to explore than any player could ever hope to see, some players are happy enough remaining on just one globe for the time being. This is the case with dedicated time-lapse map walker TheyCallMeConor who recently posted a video of their travel around exactly half of a No Man’s Sky planet – an accomplishment that took just under 12 hours.

The journey’s purpose was to find out whether or not the space-exploration title actually has “planet-sized planets,” as early reports allegedly have Sean Murray claiming. As it turns out, traveling around half of TheyCallMeConor’s chosen planet took 11 hours and 50 minutes, meaning that circumventing the entire landmass would have clocked in at just under a full day’s walk, for according to online statistics, the Earth’s circumference is almost 25,000 miles.

Given an average walking speed of 3 miles per hour, this works out at around 347 days of pure walking to travel the globe (or half that long to cover 50% of the planet). So, no, No Man’s Sky might not have planets that are, at least by Earth’s definition, planet-sized, but there could be larger masses out there that might officially pass as planets.

Other claims made during the game’s development include Murray’s statement that No Man’s Sky would take 5 billion years to explore, something that is far less likely to be disproved in the near future. Of course, the majority of the gameplay complaints don’t come from the game’s scale, but rather from the lack of stuff to do once fans are bored of exploration. The random generation of creatures and areas seems amazing at first, but due to the lack of models and textures in the game, many players claim that their travels end up looking more and more similar as time goes on.

For those who do have issues with the game at the moment, we can only hope that Hello Games are justified in its claims that the title’s next patch will make players “very happy.” The game certainly has potential, but if we had to name an example of where over-hyping severely harmed a game’s reputation – this is it.

No Man’s Sky is available now on PC and PlayStation 4.