Mass Effect 3 Launches Into Space… Literally

By | 5 years ago 

What is it with society’s fascination with launching inanimate objects into space? Now Electronic Arts is getting into the act with Mass Effect 3.

Imagine the scenario: Mass Effect 3 Super Fan is walking the dog, thinking non-stop about the Mass Effect 3 demo, the return of traditional RPG elements, the odds and ends in the collector’s edition, and of course that chilling ‘Take Earth Back’ teaser trailer — when out of nowhere, a copy of Mass Effect 3 falls out of the sky and lands right at his feet. If Super Fan’s name was Phineas or Ferb, it would be expected that something would fall out of the sky when he least expects it.

Electronic Arts will be launching copies of Mass Effect 3 into low orbit space — using weather balloons — in the cities of New York, San Francisco, Las Vegas, Berlin, London, and Paris (but not Danville). Each copy of Mass Effect 3 being launched will have a GPS tracking device onboard and fans can track their return to the Earth at masseffect.com. Those lucky enough to find the copies will be able to play the game a week or more before the game hits stores.

Surely Gene Roddenberry is rolling over in his Orbital Sciences Pegasus rocket.

Being an avid poker player, I am constantly calculating odds. A little more than 70% of the Earth is covered with water, and launching 6 copies of Mass Effect 3 into orbit via weather balloon seems to tell me that at least 4 of them are destined to spend their remaining days as a console disk looking for Jack Dawson at the bottom of the ocean. Although, I am no weather balloon expert either, so perhaps scientists have developed ways for these balloons to always find dry land.

Somewhere, the Reapers are simply laughing at us.

We at Game Rant promise to bring you the follow-up to this story as well — “Mass Effect 3 Torrents a Week Before Release – Weather Balloon Stunt Blamed.”

Mass Effect 3 will be released IN STORES March 6 for the PC, PS3 and Xbox 360.

Follow me on Twitter @mattrowland1

Source: USA Today