It’s 2011, and role-playing games couldn’t look or play any better. Conversation and player choice is just as important as competence in combat and navigation, so players who value immersive and fully-realized experiences couldn’t be happier. The time couldn’t be better for one of the genre’s oldest legends to get a second wind. That legend is none other than King’s Quest, set to return to modern consoles developed by TellTale Games, makers of the Sam & Max series.

The developer that spent the last few years on a crusade for the future of episodic releases and downloadable adventure games has got a full plate at the moment. The episodic Back to the Future game is going strong, a Heavy Rain-inspired Jurassic Park title is next up on the list, not to mention an adaptation of the hit AMC series The Walking Dead all locked up.

So you might think that the last thing TellTale would want to do is bite off one of the most world-changing and revolutionary RPGs that computer games have ever seen. Clearly the team has hit their stride, and when you’re on a roll, why stop?

The announcement came  at a recent press conference, when TellTale’s Senior VP of Marketing Steve Allison explained that the RPG reboot wouldn’t be a bite-sized game, but the start of a new chapter for the company:

“We have agreed to a multi-title, multiplatform deal to reboot the King’s Quest franchise… Much like we did with Tales of Monkey Island, we’re rebooting King’s Quest with all new episodic games and multiple series.”

The King’s Quest series ran for more than eight titles, so there is clearly enough depths for the developers to plumb. Allison wouldn’t give any more details until E3, but the studio’s history with arcade and point-and-click adventure games seem to fit right at home with King’s Quest.

With rumors circling a potential rebirth of the sister series Police Quest, the time couldn’t be better for giving the classic series a re-imagining. We really can’t give any more details of what to expect, since the result could range from a completely new take on the old formula, or an inspired re-tread in classic 8-bit graphics.

Either way, TellTale has quickly become a developer to watch, and proof that publishers can be just as effective at bringing new properties back from the dead as they can be sending them there.

No dates have been given, but stay posted for any more information on the King’s Quest reboot. TellTale can only employ so many programmers, so it may be a while before we hear any more.

Source: Joystiq

SCROLL FOR NEXT ARTICLE