Controversial Shooter ‘Hatred’ Removed from Steam by Valve

By | 2 years ago 

Valve Removes Hatred from Steam

Since its very first trailer debuted, Destructive Creations’ FPS Hatred has been a seemingly endless source of controversy. First, gamers began criticizing the game for its depictions of senseless violence. Then, Epic Games asked to have their logos removed from any finished versions of the game. Needless to say, Hatred was getting press, but for all the wrong reasons.

That trend continues to remain true, as Hatred has now made headlines after the launch of its Steam Greenlight campaign. Within just hours of launching the campaign, Hatred found itself rising through the ranks, all the way up to number 7, before Valve stepped forward and pulled the plug.

Rather than draw any undue attention its way, Valve decided it best to distance themselves from Hatred as well. Since a successful Steam Greenlight campaign eventually results in Valve publishing the game on their digital platform, the company took every step to prevent that scenario.

For those who might not be following the Hatred story as closely, the game is an isometric shooter whose sole focus is on killing as many people as possible. Not enemies, mind you, but everyday citizens, random bystanders, and even law enforcement officials. Developer Destructive Creations says that their vision is to deliver mindless entertainment rather than “higher art,” and also mention developing “something against trends,” which led many to believe the game’s sole purpose was provocation.

Hatred gameplay trailer

And provoke it has. Hatred drew attention on both sides of the line, with some praising the game for its satirical look at video game violence and others chastising it because they saw no such social commentary. The game made it to #7 on Steam Greenlight for a reason, though, and Destructive Creations is nonetheless undeterred by Valve’s decision.

Some have noted that Steam has plenty of ultra violent games in its library already, and so striking down Hatred may appear hypocritical. The Call of Duty franchise has notably featured violence against innocents, albeit in a very different context, and is regularly promoted by Valve. But, they are the curators of Steam and if they make a decision there isn’t much a developer can do. For Hatred, it appears more likely that the developers will have to find a new outlet for their game once again.

Obviously, Hatred is going to continue to generate buzz for all the wrong reasons and we won’t be surprised when it does eventually come out. But the fact that companies like Valve and Epic Games have tried to distance themselves from the game speaks volumes. At the same time, picking out one piece of “entertainment” and labeling it “bad” when compared to other forms of entertainment is a slippery slope.

Do you think Valve made the right choice with Hatred? Will this controversial game ever release?

Source: Polygon

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