Bleszinski Sees More Mobile in the ‘Evolution of Gaming’

By | 6 years ago 

The self-proclaimed ‘Tony Stark of Video Games’, Cliff Bleszinski, recently took some time to head out for an audio interview with BBC. While a recap of the Gears of War franchise takes up a majority of the interview, there was a portion in which they discussed “the evolution of gaming” and Cliff had some interesting input as to what he believed the future contained for us.

“The next generation of video game consoles might just be things that are like the iPad, where you take your pad with you and when you’re at the pub you can play a simpler version of the game and then when you bring it to the house you plug it in a docking station and it pops up on your large TV and you take your traditional controller and you play the more traditional game.”

It’s been no secret that Cliff is a fan of mobile games, having often tweeted about games like Angry Bird, which he proclaimed to be a top-hit prior to its success. However, when someone with such a key role in a company like Epic Games has such an interest it’s worth paying more attention to.

“And then this connects to people’s mobile phones so you have maybe a social element; and you do whatever you can to create what is essentially a second life for users who want to seek out that fantasy world and experience.”

There are certainly some gamers who are against this sort of evolution, thinking such social connection will lead us to Farmville-esque invites spamming inside of all games. It’s certainly believable that games are getting more and more social, but at the end of the day designers and gamers will realize that these aspects are optional, and don’t necessarily improve or ruin a gaming experience.

Cliff also discussed the danger of weapons in real life, violence in games, the balance of work and life, how he got into videogames and much more — you can check out the interview on BBC here, though make sure you have half an hour of free time before you start it!

What do you think of the interview, or Cliff’s idea of next-generation social interaction? Do you think Cliff’s idea of next generation inter-connectivity is feasible?

Source: BBC