BioShock Level Remade in Unreal Engine 4 is Stunning

By | 6 months ago 

A UK-based environment artist by the name of Ross Littlejohn uses Unreal Engine 4 to recreate the Medical Pavilion level from the first BioShock game.

Back when it first released in 2007, BioShock earned a lot of praise for its state-of-the-art graphics. Nearly 10 years later, the game, while it doesn’t look bad by any means, has dated graphics compared to most modern titles. Well, a fan by the name of Ross Littlejohn has decided to give BioShock an updated look as part of his university coursework, and the results are stunning.

Littlejohn recreated the Medical Pavilion level in BioShock using Unreal Engine 4 – which is fitting when one considers that the original game ran on Unreal Engine 2.5. According to Littlejohn, aside from the foliage and original BioShock artwork used in the recreation, he modeled and textured all the assets by himself. This is an impressive feat to the say the least, and should garner his work the attention it deserves.

Overall, Littlejohn’s work is a sight to behold, and could get fans talking about a potential BioShock remake or remaster. Rumors point to a BioShock HD Collection coming soon, but after seeing what Littlejohn has accomplished with Unreal Engine 4, a full-on remake with completely redone graphics seems like a more desirable prospect.

In the meantime, see the Medical Pavilion from the original BioShock recreated using the power of Unreal Engine 4 right here:

The decision by Epic to make Unreal Engine 4 free has resulted in plenty of fun fan projects like Ross Littlejohn’s BioShock recreation, and others. We’ve also seen The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time remade with Unreal Engine 4, along with a number of other classic video games ranging from Chrono Trigger to Pokemon.

Usually it seems as though people remake older games with Unreal Engine 4, as is the case with Chrono Trigger, Ocarina of Time, and the like. However, Littlejohn decided to give a facelift to a much more recent release with BioShock, showing that even newer games can reap major benefits from the additional power of Unreal Engine 4.

As Unreal Engine 4 continues to be adopted by game developers and prospective game developers, we will likely see even more impressive creations like this moving forward. If Littlejohn’s work recreating BioShock‘s Medical Pavilion is any indication, it seems like he could have a very bright future in game development, and it will be interesting to see what he decides to create using Unreal Engine 4 next.

Which games would you like to see get an Unreal Engine 4 makeover? Sound off in the comments below and leave us your thoughts.

BioShock is currently available for PC, PS3, Xbox 360, and iOS mobile devices, and a port to current-gen consoles is rumored as well.

Source: Ross Littlejohn (via Kotaku)