Schilling Speaks Out on 38 Studios’ Layoffs and Closure

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Just a few days after his development company, 38 Studios, was forced to lay off its entire staff and closed down Big Huge Games, Curt Schilling is speaking out. While most would imagine Schilling would come across as a man beaten, he appears to be determined to set the record straight on the collapse of his company, a collapse that may have been brought on by the same state that lured him in.

According to Schilling, the government of Rhode Island, where 38 Studios moved after a $75 Million loan was offered, reneged on a deal to provide 38 Studios with film-like tax breaks on the order of $1 Million. Those tax breaks would have allowed 38 to skip their May 1st payment deadline for their loan, and to meet payroll for that month.  Unfortunately, no such deal was struck, and the rest, we know, is history.

Schilling also laments Rhode Island Governor Chafee’s public comments about trying to keep the developer solvent, saying that Chafee’s words scared off potential investors. In fact, Schilling revealed, 38 Studios had a $35 Million deal on the table to finance a Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning sequel, but they were scared off by fears of never seeing the project.

Earlier in the month a trailer and some screenshots were released for 38’s forthcoming MMO, codenamed Project Copernicus, which made it seem like the developer still had some life. Unfortunately, those marketing materials are now stops on the road maps to the developer’s inevitable downfall.

In essence, it was a series of unfortunate events for the developer, events that ultimately led to its closure. Who’s to say if any of these scenarios had or hadn’t come to pass that 38 Studios would still have its head above water, but Schilling seems to think that to be the case.

Do you think that Rhode Island was wise not to invest further into 38 Studios? Will we ever see any more entries in the Kingdoms of Amalur franchise?

Source: Providence Journal