3DS Headaches Continue for Players and Nintendo

Mar 29, 2011 by  

Nintendo 3DS Headache Response

Nintendo’s PR department has had their hands full since the recent launch of the company’s new portable, the 3DS. While reviews of the actual hardware have been mostly positive across the gaming landscape, that hasn’t stopped the Interwebs from causing a ruckus about various aspects of the 3D entertainment gadget, including everything from the system’s price to a console crashing “black screen of death.”

It hasn’t been the smoothest launch Nintendo has ever seen. Now it seems the headache train is leaving the station once again. However this time, Nintendo has issued an official response.

Nintendo Head of Communications Robert Saunders released an official statement to MaxConsole after more complaints of headaches caused by viewing games in the crazy third dimension began to surface. Here’s what he had to say:

“We have shown Nintendo 3DS at multiple events around the world to literally hundreds of thousands of people and have received very few negative comments. As with anything that requires focus, from reading to staring at a computer screen, taking breaks frequent breaks is always recommended. When viewing any kind of 3D images (TV, movies etc.), some people might experience minor discomfort. The effects are short term and have no lasting effect, in fact most players can continue after taking a short break. The Nintendo 3D was designed with a 3D depth slider that lets users adjust the 3D effect to a level that suits them for optimum enjoyment.”

As much as it’s incredibly easy to sympathize with someone who just dropped $250 on a new device only to have it give them headaches, Nintendo really has covered all their bases on this one by issuing 3DS health warnings. They never once tried to hide the fact that headaches might be a possibility for some players. The inclusion of the depth-slider, and  the insistence that players take the occasional break — which heaven forbid gamers actually listen to — both serve as admissions that we simply don’t know how 3D will effect each individual. Therefore, Nintendo has done their best to make the experience as enjoyable as possible for all users.

Obviously everyone is excited and wants to be a part of this new facet of gaming, but understanding that it’s still a new technology is important here. Even more key is to remember that no new tech comes without a few hitches along the way.

Again, dropping a large amount of money on something that causes discomfort is far from ideal, but Nintendo isn’t forcing anyone to buy these things — a point that also seems to be lost on those griping about the 3DS’s price. Unfortunately, it is a $250 gamble that the machine might give you a headache, but it is one that both the media and Nintendo have done a good job of making potential buyers aware of.

What does the Rant crowd think? Does Nintendo need to do something more about the 3DS and the headache claims, or is this something that consumers have been educated enough on, and should know by now that it’s just one of the risks and downsides of a new technology? I know more than a handful of people that can’t play first-person shooters because it makes them dizzy and nauseous. Should they be crying foul to Bungie and Infinity Ward?

Source: MaxConsole

Tags: 3DS, Nintendo

6 Comments

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  1. haha nice hidden Vaxa ad in the header. I’ve yet to get any headaches from my 3DS, and anytime I start to feel strain on my eyes I just take a break or turn the 3D off.

  2. I havent had any problems with head aches so far. And actually the battery life seems fine as well. Im really enjoying it! Although Im playing more of the built in games rather than the ones released with the console

  3. 3ds warnings are not true I have not had any headache from playing.

  4. I’m on those people who gets headaches/nauseous easily, like when riding in a car, on a boat, staring at a 3D screen (Avatar nearly made me throw up), and unfortunately, testing out the 3DS in a store. The warnings are indeed very true for motion-sickness prone people. I’m not one of those whiners about this. I understand my place in the 3D world and understand that I won’t be buying a 3DS since my DS Lite will do just fine.

    Unfortunately, there are more people who get headaches than you might think, and these people make up the population of potential 3DS buyers. The problem isn’t whiners, it’s the 3DS not selling enough to make a worthwhile profit and 3DS games not selling enough for however much they cost to make. Already, movie theaters have had to stop their obsession with 3D technology because 3D movies cost a fortune to make but their viewers have dropped considerately. (One of the leading causes according to surveys? Headaches!)

    Nintendo can slap warnings on their equipment, but the bottom line is they want to sell their stuff. If people won’t buy it because it hurts when they test it out at the game store, they can’t do much except give it additional features over the regular DS that will make it worthwhile even without the 3D slider on.

    • Like Coobait I’m one of those gamers who gets headaches a lot (I also get them from computer screens and I never watch 3D movies – in addition to headaches, I wear regular glasses and the 3D glasses are always irritating). I actually follow the advice and take breaks every once in a while when I am playing a regular game, too.

      I don’t really know what Nintendo themselves can do. The 3D technology needs to shift as a whole to make the games and movies more comfortable for people to play. But I remember in the early days of gaming there were all sorts of warnings about the health effects of the early days video games – everything from vision problems and headaches from extended staring at games to the scary warnings every player over around 22ish remembers about seizures from the flashing lights in certain games to obesity from kids sitting around playing games instead of running around outside. This is the same – some is legitimate, and some is hype. The technology will have to address the legitimate side (and not Nintendo alone) and the hype? Well, it’ll always be around, and consumers will have to decide whether or not they buy it (both the hype, and the product).

  5. Perhaps the 3DS was simply released far ahead of the technology needed to make it perfect. This reminds me much of the Virtual Boy, Nintendo’s last expedition in 3D gaming.

    That being said, i know for a fact that i’m very prone to motion sickness (road trips are always fun D: ) and i won’t be forking out the cash for a 3DS anytime soon.

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